New York Times Experimenting with Blockchain Publishing

New York Times Experimenting with Blockchain Publishing

 

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Adoption news concerning cryptocurrency and blockchain technology keeps on coming. The New York Times, the second largest paper in the United States of America’s (and globally famous), has announced plans to implement blockchain technology in its publishing.

Revealing Job Posting

The New York times, according to this job posting, is on the lookout for someone who will ‘envision a design and blockchain-based proof of concept for news publishers.’ They want someone who ‘will codify the vision for the research project and share that vision with potential stakeholders at other media organizations’ for the next 12 months. The hire will also ‘help the brand and create a public identity and assets for the project.’

Eight years of experience is required in order to organize ‘leading a combination of engineers, designers, journalists’ in addition to “strong communication, writing and presentation skills.’ ‘A mixed skill set with some experience in at least 3 of journalism, product, design, software development, hardware engineering, user research” as well as an “Established track record in the real-world application of new technologies.’

The Start of A New Digital Print Era?

Blockchain-powered content is nothing new. However, the commitment and investigation by major publishers of blockchain’s potential mark a change of attitude. News stories of Coil, the pay-per-click XRP ledger project looking to change the way content providers receive revenue, and SatoshiPay, built utilizing the Stellar protocol to offer publisher’s access to easy install blockchain micropayments, will become more commonplace.

Declining subscription models, and pressure on media outlets to provide 24/7, immediate content, means that adoption of new technological innovation is a necessity rather than an option. And cryptocurrency based payment systems may just be the right innovation at the right time.